How should we respond to Therapists offering CAT without valid training or qualifications?

Wilton, A., 2000. How should we respond to Therapists offering CAT without valid training or qualifications?. Reformulation, ACAT News Spring, p.x.


At the last meeting of the ACAT Council the following question was on the agenda for discussion. How can we most effectively and usefully react to instances where a therapist not professionally trained in CAT is found to be offering to provide Cognitive Analytic Therapy. Two instances recently have come to the attention of Council one involving a therapist at the Pax Hill Clinic who had been receiving supervision from a CAT supervisor and the second involving three therapists working at the Cardinal Clinic, in Windsor, Berkshire all of whom described themselves in the clinic brochure as offering CAT although none had a professional qualification in CAT.

In the first instance the therapist when confronted was apologetic and ready to change the way she presented herself in her literature. In the second instance, I have not as yet received a response to my letter to the director of the Cardinal Clinic bringing the concerns of ACAT to his attention. Perhaps other members have come across similar instances.

It seems to me that in meeting such situations we have a two-fold task. On the one hand it is very important that we name and insist on the necessary minimum level of validated competence to practice CAT. Council held unanimously the view that no one may call him or herself a CAT therapist or offer CAT therapy without either a practitioner qualification in addition to his or her core profession, or completing the CAT psychotherapy training? (I am not excluding here the validation of prior learning route to attaining these levels of competency).

Council felt that it could be acceptable for say a trained psycho dynamic or cognitive therapist to state their interest in or the way they were influenced by Cognitive Analytic theory or practice but that if they were to offer CAT without the above mentioned qualifications this would be wrong.

In exercising our right to insist that only those with adequate training offer CAT therapy, I think it would be sad if we were to lose the early ethos within CAT of welcoming warmly into the group all who are interested and/or prepared to put in the time effort and energy to master this innovative way of working. When we find other professionals enthusiastic and interested we would do well to be pleased and encouraging. Explaining the routes to professional competency would be an important part of this response. Your responses are invited.

Angela Wilton

Angela Wilton died in the winter of 2001.

A Tribute to Angela Wilton

from the Chair of ACAT may be found online.
 

Full Reference

Wilton, A., 2000. How should we respond to Therapists offering CAT without valid training or qualifications?. Reformulation, ACAT News Spring, p.x.

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